Opioid Use Before Surgery Increases Risk of Poor Outcomes

Massachusetts currently leads the nation in decreasing opioids prescription, according to a Blue Cross Blue Shield report cited by The Boston Herald. Blue Cross Blue Shield's survey illustrated 51 percent fewer opioid prescriptions written in Massachusetts  in 2017 than 2013; specifically, Bay State physicians wrote 193 opioids prescriptions per 1,000 Blue Cross-insured members. The national average is 394 per 1,000 members. The study, published in Preventive Medicine, analyzed data from over 1,000 Americans. In a survey, the researchers queried respondents' attitudes on needle exchanges, (where people can dispose of used syringes and get sterile ones), safe injection sites (where people can use drugs under medical supervision) and broader opinions on addiction.

Which State Leads the US in Lowering Opioid Prescriptions?

Massachusetts currently leads the nation in decreasing opioids prescription, according to a Blue Cross Blue Shield report cited by The Boston Herald. Blue Cross Blue Shield's survey illustrated 51 percent fewer opioid prescriptions written in Massachusetts  in 2017 than 2013; specifically, Bay State physicians wrote 193 opioids prescriptions per 1,000 Blue Cross-insured members. The national average is 394 per 1,000 members. The study, published in Preventive Medicine, analyzed data from over 1,000 Americans. In a survey, the researchers queried respondents' attitudes on needle exchanges, (where people can dispose of used syringes and get sterile ones), safe injection sites (where people can use drugs under medical supervision) and broader opinions on addiction.

4 States With Big Drop in Opioid Prescriptions

Although needle exchanges and safe injection sites have numerous studies backing their effectiveness in fighting opioid addiction, a recent study revealed many Americans oppose both — a stigma that could harm the nation's response to the opioid epidemic, Vox reports. The study, published in Preventive Medicine, analyzed data from over 1,000 Americans. In a survey, the researchers queried respondents' attitudes on needle exchanges, (where people can dispose of used syringes and get sterile ones), safe injection sites (where people can use drugs under medical supervision) and broader opinions on addiction.

Social Stigma Concerning Opioid Use Hinders Fight

Although needle exchanges and safe injection sites have numerous studies backing their effectiveness in fighting opioid addiction, a recent study revealed many Americans oppose both — a stigma that could harm the nation's response to the opioid epidemic, Vox reports. The study, published in Preventive Medicine, analyzed data from over 1,000 Americans. In a survey, the researchers queried respondents' attitudes on needle exchanges, (where people can dispose of used syringes and get sterile ones), safe injection sites (where people can use drugs under medical supervision) and broader opinions on addiction.

Healthy Options: Tech Companies Reduce Chronic Pain

Hinge Health, a San Francisco startup that developed a 12-week remote monitoring program to reduce chronic knee pain and back pain, has published the results of a randomized control study to illustrate the effectiveness of its program for chronic knee pain. The program is intended to provide a noninvasive alternative to surgery to reduce chronic musculoskeletal pain.

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