Behavioral Health Challenges, Changes For America

Population trend data outlines the behavioral health challenges and changes occurring throughout the United States. For payers, understanding the movement of population segments help estimate coverage patterns and potential for claims submissions. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) released an annual survey of the population of the United States ages 12 years or older. The main First Findings Report contains a cross-section of NSDUH data on substance use and substance use disorders, mental health issues among adults and adolescents, and co-occurring disorders.

Uninsured Numbers Growing In Unexpected Areas, Survey Finds

There was a significant change in uninsured numbers growing for people ages 35 to 49, adults making more than 400 percent of the federal poverty level ($47,520 for an individual and $97,200 for a family of four), and those living in states that have not expanded Medicaid, according to a new Commonwealth Fund survey. Policy fixes like expanding Medicaid in all states, making premium subsidies available to more people, and assisting consumers as they shop for coverage on the marketplaces, the report finds, could address some of the barriers the uninsured face in gaining coverage.

Value-Based Contract Barriers for Innovative Medicines

The shift under way in payment in US health care - from volume to value - has sparked interest in new contracting arrangements to pay for prescription drugs. The objective of these new arrangements is to reward successful outcomes of medication use in patients, rather than pay based on the volume of drugs sold. Unfortunately, value-based contract barriers stand in the way of one approach to managing drug costs and obtaining better value for money spent. However, achieving the full potential of these contracts will necessitate regulatory and other changes.

2017-09-06T18:17:28+00:00 By |Big Data, Managed Care, Trends|

Drug-Related Risks and Outcomes: 1st Annual National Report

The purpose of this first annual surveillance report is to summarize the latest information available on the national level for various drug-related risks and health outcomes, health behaviors, and prescribing patterns related to the drug problem in the United States. The most recent year of information available is different for different outcomes. The emphasis is on national information, but some state information is also presented. This document is intended to serve as a resource for payers, providers, and pharma companies charged with addressing this ongoing national problem. It will be updated annually.

Collaborative Payer Provider Model Enhances Primary Care

Rising health care costs are threatening the fiscal solvency of patients, employers, payers, and governments. The Collaborative Payer Provider Model (CPPM) addresses this challenge by reinventing the role of the payer into a full-service collaborative ally of the physician. The article written by Thomas Doerr, Lisa Olsen, and Deborah Zimmerman for MDPI AG (Basel, Switzerland) identified and tested elements of the Collaborative Payer Provider Model (CPPM). Also in this post, the summary of the major differences between traditional payers and the CPPM.

2017-08-30T17:59:21+00:00 By |Trends|

Social Determinants: Payer Cases Improving Member Health

Currently, payer strategies focus on finding healthy populations, segmenting the markets, and segmenting populations, with the target of avoiding costly procedures. Population management and all the big data trends became useful tools in those payer strategies. With the results from a study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and a position paper by America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), social determinants quickly rose as the next measurable data used by payers.

Injured Worker Compensation Claims Uncover Relief

The results from a recently released report identified promising results in some of 26 state workers’ compensation systems. Using data comprising over 400,000 nonsurgical injured worker compensation claims with more than seven days of lost time, and over 2 million prescriptions are associated with these claims from 26 states, a new study from the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) observed considerable decreases in the prevalence of longer-term dispensing of opioids to injured workers in a number of states studied.

Insurance Coverage Improve Health Outcomes In Four Ways: NEJM

The national debate over the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has involved substantial discussion about what effects — if any — insurance coverage has on health and mortality. Health plans play a leadership role in healthcare reforms. While debate continues, a recent piece in the New England Journal of Medicine answers one main question. Does having insurance coverage improve health outcomes?

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